Sex and War: How Biology Explains Warfare and Terrorism and Offers a Path to a Safer World

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BenBella Books #ad - Drawing on these new insights, they propose a rational plan for making warfare less frequent and less brutal in the future. As a scientist and obstetrician, malcolm Potts has worked with governments and aid organizations globally, and in the trenches with women who have been raped and brutalized in the course of war.

A look at the evolutionary causes of violent conflicts that’s “worth reading, and arguing about” Toronto Star.  . Combining their own experience with scientific findings in primatology, rape, and anthropology, Potts and journalist Thomas Hayden explain war’s pivotal position in the human experience, and how men in particular evolved under conditions that favored gang behavior, genetics, and organized aggression.

Sex and War: How Biology Explains Warfare and Terrorism and Offers a Path to a Safer World #ad - Why does war seem to be so fundamental to our species? And is there anything we can do about it?  Sex and War explores these questions from the frontlines of war-torn countries around the world. Anyone interested in understanding human nature, and terrorism at their most fundamental levels will find Sex and War to be an illuminating work, warfare, and one that might change the way they see the world.

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Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present

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The New Press #ad - Big history interweaves different disciplines of knowledge, drawing on both the natural sciences and the human sciences, to offer an all-encompassing account of history on Earth. This new edition is more relevant than ever before, as we increasingly grapple with accelerating rates of change and, ultimately, the legacy we will bequeath to future generations.

Here is a path-breaking portrait of our world, from the birth of the universe from a single point the size of an atom to life on a twenty-first-century planet inhabited by seven billion people. After all, our five thousand years of recorded civilization account for only about one millionth of the lifetime of our planet Kirkus Reviews.

Big History: From the Big Bang to the Present #ad - This exciting saga crosses space and time to illustrate how humans, born of stardust, were shaped—and how they in turn shaped the world we know today. Publishers weekly   this book offers “world history on a grand scale”—pulling back for a wider view and putting the relatively brief time span of human history in context.

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Are We Rome?: The Fall of an Empire and the Fate of America

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Mariner Books #ad - Are we rome? is just about a perfect book.  .  .  . Looking at the blinkered, insular culture of our capitals; the debilitating effect of bribery in public life; the paradoxical issue of borders; and the weakening of the body politic through various forms of privatization, Murphy persuasively argues that we most resemble Rome in the burgeoning corruption of our government and in our arrogant ignorance of the world outside—two things that must be changed if we are to avoid Rome’s fate.

In this “provocative and lively” book, cullen murphy points out that today we focus less on the Roman Republic than on the empire that took its place, and reveals a wide array of similarities between the two societies The New York Times. Depending on who’s doing the talking, the history of Rome serves as either a triumphal call to action—or a dire warning of imminent collapse.

Are We Rome?: The Fall of an Empire and the Fate of America #ad - What went wrong in imperial rome, and how we can avoid it: “If you want to understand where America stands in the world today, read this. Thomas E. I wish every politician would spend an evening with this book. James Fallows. Ricks the rise and fall of ancient Rome has been on American minds since the beginning of our republic.

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The Hinge Factor: How Chance and Stupidity Have Changed History

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Arcade Publishing #ad - From the trojan horse to a photograph snapped in Vietnam, world history has been shaped as much by chance and error as by courage and heroism. Despite impossible odds, invincible armies fall in bitter defeat to weaker opponents. Conflicts are decided by the caprice of weather, unlikely heroism, erroneous intelligence, strange coincidence, or individual incompetence—in short, by the unpredictable “hinge factor.

The Hinge Factor: How Chance and Stupidity Have Changed History #ad - Durschmied is a supremely gifted reporter who has transformed the media he works in. Newsweek  . How and why does this happen? what decides the fate of battle?   writing with the style and flair that made him an award-winning war correspondent, Erik Durschmied explores the fistful of nails that could have won Waterloo for Napoleon; the barrel of schnapps that proved disastrous for an Austrian emperor; and the three cigars that changed the course of Antietam; and many other instances when chance decided history’s path.

An award-winning war correspondent delves into history’s major conflicts and reveals how—in war—the improbable and inconceivable can determine events.

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Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain

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Mariner Books #ad - Here, bestselling author and distinguished scientist Antonio Demasio concludes the groundbreaking trilogy he began with Descartes’ Error by drawing on his innovative research and experience with neurological patients to examine the cerebral processes of human emotion. Today, health clubs, and other sorts of consumption; yet the inner workings of our minds—what feelings are, how they work, vacation retreats, prescription drugs, we spend countless resources doctoring our feelings with alcohol, therapy, and what they mean—are still largely an unexplored frontier.

Succeeds in making the latest brain research accessible to the general reader, while his passionate Spinozist reflections make that data relevant to everyday life. Publishers Weekly. With scientific expertise and “a flair for writing, ” he navigates the neurology of feelings The New York Review of Books.

Looking for Spinoza: Joy, Sorrow, and the Feeling Brain #ad - Achieves a unique combination of scientific exposition, historical discovery and deep personal statement regarding the human condition. Nature   “Damasio.  .  . Damasio has the rare talent of rendering science intelligible while also being gifted in philosophy, literature and wit. Margaret jacob, los angeles Times   “Exceptionally engaging and profoundly gratifying .

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Origins: Cosmos, Earth, and Mankind

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Helios Press #ad - A compelling scientific exploration of the birth of the universe, the building blocks of life, and the possibilities for the future of mankind. Proactive, and free of technical or scientific jargon, life on Earth, Origins offers compelling insights into how the universe, informative, and the human species began.

Until now, most of these questions were addressed by religion and philosophy. But science has reached a point where it, too, can contribute to the conversation. Beginning with the big bang roughly fifteen billion years ago, and living creatures, the authors trace the evolution of the cosmos, from the first particles to atoms, organisms, the development of cells, molecules, up to the arrival of Homo erectus and Homo sapiens.

Origins: Cosmos, Earth, and Mankind #ad - What are we? where do we come from? where are we going?   in this probing book, an organic chemist, three eminent scientists—an astrophysicist, and an anthropologist—discuss some of the fundamnetal questions that have obsessed humankind through the ages and offer enlightening answers in terms the layperson can understand.

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Essays in Skepticism

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Philosophical Library/Open Road #ad - Essays in Skepticism #ad - Here are titles, taken at random from the table of contents: psychoanalysis Takes a Look; Envy and Belief; On Male Superiority; What Social Science Can Do; Intellectual Rubbish; Don’t Be Too Certain; On Being Old. In this small book are some of his old but nonetheless remarkable observations, and some of the thoughts he expressed on his 90th birthday.

From one of the greatest philosophers of the twentieth century: A collection of accessible and enlightening essays on topics from envy to intellectual rubbish. Russell, is always meaningful, the sage non-conformist, no matter what the topic or the issue.  .

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Life Everlasting: The Animal Way of Death

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Mariner Books #ad - When a good friend with a severe illness wrote, asking if he might have his “green burial” at Bernd Heinrich’s hunting camp in Maine, it inspired the acclaimed biologist to investigate a subject that had long fascinated him. Heinrich reveals, thereby turning not dust to dust, how and where humans still play our ancient and important role as scavengers, too, but life to life.

How exactly does the animal world deal with the flip side of the life cycle? and what are the lessons, “the premier northern undertakers”; and the “inadvertent teamwork” among wolves and large cats, imparted by a close look at how the animal world renews itself?   Heinrich focuses his wholly original gaze on the fascinating doings of creatures most of us would otherwise turn away from—field mouse burials conducted by carrion beetles; the communication strategies of ravens, ecological to spiritual, foxes and weasels, bald eagles and nuthatches in cold-weather dispersal of prey.

Life Everlasting: The Animal Way of Death #ad - Life everlasting shines with the authenticity and originality that are unique to a life devoted to natural history in the field. Edward O. Wilson, author of the meaning of Human Existence and The Social Conquest of Earth  . If it has not been clear to readers by now, this book confirms that Bernd Heinrich is one of the finest naturalists of our time.

An enlightening look at animal behavior and the cycle of life and death, from “one of the finest naturalists of our time” Edward O. Wilson.

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God's Jury: The Inquisition and the Making of the Modern World

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Mariner Books #ad - Established by the catholic Church in 1231, the Inquisition continued in one form or another for almost seven hundred years. From torquemada to guantánamo and beyond, and only too well, in our world” Jane Mayer, Cullen Murphy finds the ‘inquisitorial impulse’ alive, author of Dark Money. As time went on, its methods and mindset spread far beyond the Church to become tools of secular persecution.

Murphy wears his erudition lightly, writes with quiet wit, and has a delightful way of seeing the past in the present. Mark bowden, very smart, author of Hue 1968   “Beautifully written, and devilishly engaging. The boston Globe. God’s jury is a reminder, and we need to be constantly reminded, and when they wield real power, that the most dangerous people in the world are the righteous, look out.

God's Jury: The Inquisition and the Making of the Modern World #ad -  .  .  . The inquisition pioneered surveillance, censorship, and “scientific” interrogation. Though associated with the persecution of heretics and Jews—and with burning at the stake—its targets were more numerous, its techniques were more ambitious, and its effect on history has been greater than many understand.

Traveling from freshly opened vatican archives to the detention camps of guantánamo to the filing cabinets of the Third Reich, legal and political evolution of the Inquisition and the inquisitorial process from its origins in late medieval Christian France to its eerily familiar, the author of Are We Rome? “masterfully traces the social, secular cousin in the modern world” San Francisco Chronicle.

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The Rise and Fall of the Bible: The Unexpected History of an Accidental Book

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Mariner Books #ad - Christianity thrived for centuries without any Bible—there was no official canon of scriptures, much less a book big enough to hold them all. The farther we go back in the holy text’s history, the more versions we find.    . In a lively journey from early christianity to the present, this book explores how a box of handwritten scrolls became the Bible, and how the multibillion-dollar business that has brought us Biblezines and Manga Bibles is selling down the Book’s sacred capital.

In calling for a fresh understanding of the ways scriptures were used in the past, the author of Biblical Literacy offers the chance to rediscover a Bible, and a faith, that is truer to its own history—not a book of answers, but a library of questions. Congregations used various collections of scrolls and codices.

The Rise and Fall of the Bible: The Unexpected History of an Accidental Book #ad - As the author reveals, there is no “original” Bible, no single source text behind the thousands of different editions on the market today. A professor of religion offers an “engrossing and excellent” look at how the Good Book has changed—and changed the world—through the ages Publishers Weekly, starred review.

Showing us how a single official text was created from the proliferation of different scripts, Timothy Beal traces its path as it became embraced as the word of God and the Book of books.

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Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are

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Mariner Books #ad - He believes that our identity lies not in our genes, but in the connections between our brain cells—our particular wiring. Accessible, witty .  .  . Seung and a dedicated group of researchers are leading the effort to map these connections, neuron by neuron, synapse by synapse. Connectome is a mind-bending adventure story offering a daring scientific and technological vision for understanding what makes us who we are, as individuals and as a species.

An important new researcher, philosopher and popularizer of brain science .  .  . Our genome may determine our eye color and even aspects of our character. One of the wall street journal’s 10 best nonfiction books of the year and a Publishers Weekly “Top Ten in Science” Title   Every person is unique, but science has struggled to pinpoint where, precisely, that uniqueness resides.

Connectome: How the Brain's Wiring Makes Us Who We Are #ad - Seung’s remarkable clarity of exposition that the reader is swept along with his enthusiasm, as he moves from the basics of neuroscience out to the farthest regions of the hypothetical, sketching out a spectacularly illustrated giant map of the universe of man. Thenew york times   “an elegant primer on what’s known about how the brain is organized and how it grows, modifies or repairs itself, wires its neurons, perceives its environment, and stores information.

This is complicated stuff, and it is a testament to Dr. The question is: how?   Sebastian Seung is at the forefront of a revolution in neuroscience.

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